A-30.08.010
"Tea house on Hirschkuh mountain."
Lutz, Samuel (Mr)
date early : 1895-01-01.0., date late : 1907-12-31.0.



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BUILDING MATERIALS

In many parts of Asia, buildings are still constructed by traditional methods such as reed or palm leaf-thatch, stone, mud and dung plastering and timber-frames, without using the expertise of professional engineers or architects. In India, for instance, a variety of structures are built with locally available materials, bearing in mind the extremes of climate in different parts of the country. The choice of building materials was and still is determined not only by local availability and climate, but most importantly, by affordability. So, while people often build in 'temporary' material their aspirations for a dwelling in 'permanent' materials underlies the decisions and choices they make while striving for a lasting dwelling. However, the fact remains, that on account of a poor economy, the great tradition and construction skill of the 'kutcha' (built in poor materials) buildings cannot be easily forgotten or ignored. Furthermore, they still form the majority landscape of India- both in rural as well as urban areas.

Thatched Roofs, houses of bark
Thatch, with its natural handcrafted charm, is an adaptable and inexpensive building material that provides a soothing and pastoral ambience to any home or public building. Thatch also supplies insulation in terms of both sound and temperature, providing warmth in the winter months and coolness in summer. It is thus extremely energy efficient as also waterproof and can withstand any damage from strong winds. Additionally, thatch conforms to curving surfaces unlike any other roofing material - thus achieving great flexibility in form at a very affordable price and efficient use of resources.
A-30.08.010: "Tea house on Hirschkuh Mountain."

In Asia, diverse natural materials have been used for thatching, including grass, straw, tree-bark, coconut palm and date palm fiber, woven mats, leaves and fronds. Coconut-leaves and fiber are additionally used for the manufacture of brooms, baskets, umbrellas, and screens to cool rooms, fans, and firewood and coir rope, often woven into mats.

THATCHED ROOFS, HOUSES OF BARK, PALM RIB, TIMBER-F.C.| Pages: 1 2 3 4
STONE | Pages: 1 2
BRICKS AND TILES, TILE FACTORIES, TILE WORKS | Pages: 1 2 3 4
MANGALORE TILES, TILED ROOFS, LIME MORTAR | Pages: 1 2
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BUILDING MATERIALS

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