B-30.61.059
"Sampit, where people pause in their journeys. You see the mosque, and on the right with its high entrance arch the Koran School." Göttin, Johann Wilhelm (Mr), date early : 1939-01-01.0., date late : 1939-12-31.0.


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ISLAMIC MOSQUES AND TOMBS

The development of mosque architecture began in the first Hijra century and many mosques thereafter were fashioned on the Prophet’s mosque at Medina – a basic structure, which was square in plan with columns made of palm tree trunks, an open courtyard and mud brick walls. In fact, in its original idea, the mosque or masjid is a representation of Islamic architecture in its simplest form, an enclosure for community gathering and prayer, the reading of the Quran and other religious functions. This building type, often comprises an open courtyard surrounded by a pillared verandah, with the covered areas capped by a dome – the archetypal image of the mosque. Although the primary function of the mosque is prayer, through history mosques have also been used for political, judicial, social, military and educational functions, with a school or library attached to some mosques. As a socio-religious institution, the mosque has acquired the function of a focal community centre in most Islamic societies.
B-30.61.059 : "Sampit, where people pause in their journeys. You see the mosque, and on the right with its high entrance arch the Koran School."
QQ-30.033.0020 : "Cairo, mosque with dome."
QQ-30.033.0021 : "Cairo, the Blue Mosque with its minaret."
QQ-30.068.0014 : "Cairo."
QU-30.003.0103 : "Street in Accra."
QW-30.016.0001 : "The mosque of 100 arches & 100 domes"

The mosque is divided into certain essential segments: a wall or qibla facing Mecca, the Holy City, with an adjoining porch or portico protecting the assembly from the sun and a pool or other source of water used for ritual cleansing often located at the centre of the courtyard or sahn. A sacred niche, the mihrab, located in the qibla wall, points in the direction of Mecca and it is here that Muslims pray, facing Mecca. Some mosques could have a number of mihrabs for decorative or functional purposes. To the right of the mihrab is the minbar or pulpit for the reading of the Quran. Many larger mosques where Muslims gather for Friday or Juma prayers are called the Jama, Jami or Juma Masjids. Minarets were later additions to mosque architecture. Symbolic of power, they served as a place from where the muezzin's call of prayer could be heard far and wide. Naturally, as this basic type was adapted to different locales across the Middle East and Asia, the form of the building evolved, not only to synthesise local architectural elements, but more importantly to integrate details resulting from the availability of material and responses to climatic conditions, cultural traditions and available technologies.

ISLAMIC MOSQUES AND TOMBS | Pages: 1 2 3 4
TOMBS | Pages: 1
INDIA & BIJAPUR | Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6
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