C-30.70.017
"Street in Calicut, a temple in the background." [Caption on mount]
"661. Street Scene, Calicut." [Caption on image].
date late : 1902-05-31.0.
unknown studio



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CALICUT

Kozhikode, also known as Calicut, is an important port-city in the northern part of Kerala state in southwestern India. Renowned as a cotton-weaving centre, Calicut is, in fact, named after the cotton fabric known as ‘calico’, which was made in the region as early as the 11th century. The fabric, woven in plain or tabby weave was printed with simple designs in one or more colours and became an important export commodity in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is believed that the name Kozhikode, however, is derived from the fortified palace or koyil kotta built by a Samoothiri ruler, called the Zamorin by the Portuguese.

Arab traders first settled in the 7th century at Calicut, which later also attracted many Europeans because of its trade in ivory, timber, pepper, cinnamon, ginger and other spices. After the 13th century Calicut grew in importance as a port and the capital of the powerful kingdom of the Samoothiris or the Zamorins. Vasco da Gama, the Portuguese explorer who discovered the sea route to India, reached Kappad Beach in Calicut in 1498 and in 1511 the Portuguese built a fortified trading post here but abandoned it in 1525. Almost a century later, an English expedition visited Calicut in 1615, but it was only in 1664 that the British East India Company established a trading post. The French followed in 1698 and the Danes in 1752. Hyder Ali, the 18th-century ruler and military commander of Mysore captured and destroyed Calicut in 1765. In 1790 the British occupied the town and it passed into their hands by treaty in 1792, when the citizens returned and rebuilt the city.

Today, Kozhikode is an important trading centre for hosiery, coffee curing, timber and tiles; exports include coconut products, pepper, ginger, coffee and tea. The port is closed during the monsoon season, and ships are anchored three miles (5 km) offshore at other seasons. Kozhikode is also the seat of the Calicut University, which has colleges of arts and sciences, medical and teacher-training colleges, and a marine-research institute. Historically, the Basel Mission led the way in Calicut in education as well as in the tile and weaving industries.
C-30.70.017 "Street in Calicut, a temple in the background"

CALICUT, BASEL MISSION CHURCHES, EDUCATION | Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
TEMPLES & PAGODAS | Pages: 1 2 3 4 5
HINDU TEMPLES OF INDIA | Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
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